List of 50+ Types of Lilies Along with Growing and Care Information

One of the best-recognized garden plants, lilies are arguably the most popular flower to grow among gardeners all over the world. The stunning flowers, sweet fragrance, availability of countless color varieties, along with its low maintenance needs are all in favor of its popularity.

Divisions of Lily Types and Hybrids

With hundreds of wild and hybrid varieties, true lilies are classified into the following 9 divisions:

I) Asiatic hybrids

Derived from lilies native to Central and East Asia. Medium-sized unscented flowers of various colors, mostly grown for ornamental purposes.

Characteristics: Cold-hardy, early bloomers, easy to grow in any type of well-drained soil with ample sunlight. Flowers in June-July.
II) Martagon hybrids

Derived from species like martagon, Hanson’s, and wheel lilies. Feature bunches of small drooping flowers of striking colors with curled petals and mild sweet scents, resembling the Turk’s cap.

Characteristics: Early bloomers, grows best in cool shady areas, not suitable for hot, humid climates; may take a year to establish, thriving afterward.
III) Candidum hybrids

Derived primarily from a number of European lily species like Madonna lily, Pyrenean lily, Lilium chalcedonicum, and Lilium kesselringianum. Produces fragrant flowers of different colors.

Characteristics: Blooms in late spring or early summer. Does well in semi-alkaline soils, but can grow in most soil types. Winter hardy, can survive the fall season.
IV) American hybrids

Derived from lilies native to North America, including Bolander’s, Canada, Columbia, and Kelley’s lilies. Mostly non-fragrant, the flowers may be funnel-shaped or downward-facing with curled petals.

Characteristics: Blooms from May to June (late spring) in warm regions, and from June end to July (midsummer) in cooler regions; Bulbous rootstocks grow to form huge clumps unless managed.
V) Longiflorum hybrids

Mostly hybrids of the Easter lily, all plants in this group produces trumpet-shaped white flowers having a sweet fragrance.

Characteristics: Blooms midsummer; easy to germinate from seeds, but not very hardy in most garden environments.
VI) Trumpet/Aurelian Hybrids

Derived from fragrant Asian species like Henry’s, and regal lilies, as well as their interspecific hybrids. Trumpet-shaped flowers are fragrant, some varieties are night-fragrant.

Characteristics: Easy to grow (especially the L. henryi hybrids), blooms from June to August (mid- to late summer), prefers warmer climates with full sun, can grow various soil types, does well in containers, intolerant to frost.
VII) Oriental hybrids

Derived from Asian species including Golden-rayed lily, Lilium speciosum, Lilium nobilissimum, and their crossbreeds. As opposed to the non-fragrant Asiatic division, Oriental lilies have the large sweetly scented flowers.

Characteristics: Needs well-drained loamy soil, morning sunlight and afternoon shade; the hybrids of L. auratum and L. speciosum are usually hardier; flowers showiest around August, but may bloom till fall.
VIII) Interdivisional Hybrids

Derived through crossbreeding between the plants in the previous seven divisions. One popular group being the Orienpet lilies (OrientalxTrumpet).

Characteristics: Usually easy to take care of when planted in well-drained loamy soil with lots of sunlight.
IX) True Species

All the wild native lilies used both in gardening and for crossbreeding. Though they are often found in the wild, many species are actually quite difficult to grow in gardens.

Characteristics: Growing conditions and flowering season depends on their native range.

As with any garden plant, it is better to find out in advance about the different types and their habits so you can pick a plant best suited to your garden. Just make sure not plant them in a spot where they can come in contact with your clothes as lily pollen stain fabrics easily.

Popular Lily Varieties Based on Color

Here is a list of over 50 popular types of lilies, both species, and hybrids, with pictures and basic information:

A) Types of White Lilies

1. Philippine Lily (Lilium philippinense)

Philippine Lily

A rare species, considered endangered, thriving only in the high altitude regions of Cordillera Central mountains in Puerto Rico. Blooms in May.

Height: 5-6 feet

Flower Type: 4-5 inches long trumpet-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10-11

2. Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum)

Easter Lily

One of the best-known species in horticulture, it can be grown both outdoors and in a container. Flowers in July-August, but potted plants may be ‘manipulated’ to bloom at other times, typically during Easter.

Height: 3 feet

Flower Type: 5-7 inches long, cylindrical

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

3. Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum)

Madonna Lily

Cultivation of this variety goes back to at least 3,000 years, with the flowers appearing in multiple religious documents and artworks including the Bible. Blooms in late spring to summer with long-lasting blossoms.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: Trumpet-shaped, 2-3-inches, growing in bunches of 10-20 units at the top of the stem

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

4. Regale/Royal (Lilium regale)

Regale Lily

Easy to grow, this plant can tolerate almost any soil and climate conditions, except waterlogging. Suitable for a container plant as well.

Height: 4-7 feet

Flower Type: 6-8 inches long, trumpet-shaped, slightly curved with strong fragrance

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

5. Lady Alice (Trumpet/Aurelian)

Lady Alice Lily

Winner of various gardening awards, it grows extremely showy white orange flowers.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 3-4 inches, Lightly fragrant, semi-turk’s cap shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

6. Patricia’s Pride (Asiatic)

Patricia’s Pride Lily

Medium-sized plants are suitable for container planting, as well as outdoor gardens, especially borders and hedges.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 4-5 inches long, upright, open blooms

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

7. Casablanca (Oriental)

Casablanca Lily

Often regarded as the most striking Oriental white lily variety, the wonderfully scented flowers make excellent cut flowers. Can be grown as container plants as well.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: Around 7 inches wide, upward-facing, open, star-shaped, with slightly curved petals

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-10

B) Different Types of Pink Lilies

1. Nodding Lily (Lilium cernuum)

Nodding Lily

Needing less care than some of the other species, it does well in loamy soil with sufficient sunlight. The flowers, blooming in summer are mostly pink, but maybe white to pale purple as well.

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: 2-3 inches, recurved Turk’s cap styled, down-facing

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

2. Jersey Lily (Amaryllis belladonna)

Jersey Lily

Thrives in any well-drained soil when planted at a sunny spot, flowering during late summer to fall. Scented flowers appear before leaves, growing in groups of 2-12 on each stem. The plants go dormant in winter, reappearing the following summer in warm climates.

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: 2-4 inches, outward-facing, open, growing in the direction of the sun

USDA Hardiness Zone: 7-10 (can grow as an annual plant in other zones)

3. Acapulco (Oriental)

Acapulco Lily

Originally meant for the cut flower industry, these vibrant lilies have grown popular among gardeners as well. Produces up to 5-6 flowers per stem.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 6 inches or larger, outward-facing, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-10

4. Elodie (Asiatic)

Elodie Lily

Each stem produces 5-6 sterile flowers of a pastel pink shade and a soft, pleasant fragrance. The scent is not overwhelming, making it a good option for allergic people.

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, outward-facing, double flower (May produce  single flowers in the first year)

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-10

5. Stargazer (Oriental)

Stargazer Lily

Considered as the most popular and visually appealing Oriental variety, it produces 4-8 flowers per stem. Regarded for its strong fragrance, but some people find it too sweet to like.

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: Over 6 inches long, upward-facing, fragrant, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

6. Altari (Orienpet)

Altari Lily

Available to grow to different heights, it is suitable for outdoor planting as borders in larger gardens for a touch of color as well as providing privacy.

Height: 3-5 feet

Flower Type: 6-12 inches, slightly recurved, out-facing, wide open

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

7. Lollypop (Asiatic)

Lollypop Lily

Ideal for a container plant, needing repotting once every 2-3 years. Needs excellent drainage and lots of sunlight, but can grow in partial shade too. When planted outdoors in favorable conditions, it multiplies pretty fast.

Height: 1.5-3 feet

Flower Type: Upward-facing open blooms

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-10

8. Starlight Express (Oriental)

Starlight Express Lily

Dwarf variety suitable for container planting. Also good for flower beds and low borders, as it produces up to 15 flowers in each stem.

Height: 1-2 feet

Flower Type: 6-7 inches, upright, fragrant, slightly recurved with ruffled edges

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

9. Tom Pouce (Oriental)

Tom Pouce Lily

Another striking variety, growing 5-10 pink-yellow flowers on tall stalks. A nice option for small gardens as the pleasant scent travels through the air without being overwhelming.

Height: Up to 3 feet

Flower Type: 6 inches or larger, wide-open, outward facing

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

10. Silk Road (Orienpet)

Silk Road Lily

Tall plants ideal to be planted as borders, or in front of windows for best enjoying the long display of attractive flowers over several weeks, while getting some privacy.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: 8 inches, slightly recurved, sideways facing

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

11. Anastasia (Orienpet)

Anastasia Lily

A high-yielding variety, growing 20-30 flowers on each plant, with an extended blooming season of several weeks. The pink color of the flowers deepens in colder weathers.

Height: 4-7 feet

Flower Type: 7 inches, slightly recurved, sideways or downward-facing

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

C) Orange and Peach Lilies

1. Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium)

Tiger Lily

One of the most recognizable types, it can grow in moist acidic soil with full to partial sun exposure. The flowers are non-fragrant, but extremely showy, blooming in summer.

Height: 3-6 feet

Flower Type: over 6 inches, down-facing, recurved or Turk’s cap shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

2. Michigan Lily (Lilium michiganense)

Michigan Lily

Sometimes confused with Turk’s cap and tiger lilies for similar-looking flowers, it is considered threatened in many US states. Can grow in different soils with enough sunlight. Non-fragrant flowers bloom in summer.

Height: 2-6 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches, down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

3. Columbia Lily (Lilium columbianum)

Columbia Lily

Aa attractive wild lily species, it is not as common as some of the other wild varieties. Grows in well-drained moist soils, blooming in late spring to early summer. Flowers are lightly scented.

Height: 2-4 feet

Flower Type: 2-3 inches, down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

4. Fire Lily (Lilium bulbiferum)

Fire Lily

Grows in any well-drained soil as long as it gets a lot of sunlight; though, cannot tolerate drought conditions. Blooms from late spring to summer, with 6-7 flowers on each stalk. Dwarf cultivar is suitable for container planting.

Height: 2-4 feet

Flower Type: 2-3 inches, upright, wide open

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

5. Alpine/Sierra Tiger Lily (Lilium parvum)

Sierra Tiger Lily

Grows is moist well-drained soil, and naturally hybridizes with any other lily species growing nearby. Blooms around midsummer, in clusters of 6-7 flowers on each stem.

Height: 2-6 feet (sometimes up to 8 feet)

Flower Type: Smaller than 3 inches, side-facing, open, bell-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

6. Turk’s Cap (Lilium superbum)

Turk’s Cap Lily

Has high care requirement, even higher than other species lilies. Prefers well-drained, moist soils with lots of sunlight, but can grow in other soil types. Good cold tolerance.

Height: 3-5 feet

Flower Type: 5-6 inches, down-facing, pendant, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

7. African Queen (Trumpet)

African Queen Lily

Blooms mid to late summer, producing 20-30 flowers in each stem for long display season.

Height: 3-6 feet

Flower Type: 6-12 inches, side/out- facing, trumpet-shaped, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

8. Forever Susan (Asiatic)

Forever Susan Lily

One of the most attractive types with its unique orange-plum color. Suitable for small to large gardens as borders, as well as for cut flowers

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: 4-5 inches, upright, wide-open, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

9. Gluhwein (Orienpet)

Gluhwein Lily

Soft peach colored blooms with their wonderful fragrance are excellent for summer gardens. Flowers are sterile, and plants do not produce seeds.

Height: 3-5 feet

Flower Type: 6-12 inches, out-facing, wide open, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

10. Tiny Double You (Asiatic)

Tiny Double You Lily

Dwarf variety, winter-hardy, ideal for container planting, but can be grown outdoors as well. Striking orange double flowers make good cut flowers.

Height: 1-1.5 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, upward-facing, double flowers

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-9

D) Types of Purple and Black Lilies

1. Martagon Lily (Lilium martagon)

Martagon Lily

An award winning species lily, the sweetly scented flowers may vary from white and light pinkish purple to deep violet. Can grow upto 30-40 flowers per stem in each blooming season. Does well in slightly alkaline well-drained moist soil.

Height: 3 to 7 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches or smaller, down-turned, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 10

2. Toad Lily (Tricyrtis hirta)

Toad Lily

Medium-sized plant from Japan, the small spotted flowers remind you of orchids. The plants need partial to full shade, and soil that remains consistently moist and well-drained. Self-seeding plants will multiply over time, but are not invasive. Blooms in early to late fall. Suitable for borders and sidewalks.

Height: 2-3 feet

Flower Type: 2-3 inches, upward-facing, wide open, star-like

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

3. Night Rider (Asiatic x Trumpet)

Night Rider Lily

A relatively new caltivar, the deep purple to black flowers have a mild scent. Due to their vivid color, the large flowers stand out, adding to the character of your garden. Blooms from early to mid summer.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 6-7 inches, out-facing, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

4. Pink Perfection (Trumpet)

Pink Perfection Lily

Tall plants with a stunning display of 15-20 large flowers on each stalk, creating a nice contrast with the narrow dark green leaves. Plants are quite hardy and disease-resistant.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: 10-12 inches, trumpet-shaped, somewhat down-facing, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

5. Landini (Asiatic)

Landini Lily

One of the darkest varieties that produce 5-6 large flowers on each stalk. The blooms are rather long-lasting, with the medium to tall plants being suitable for most gardens.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 6-12 inches, upright, wide open

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

6. Night Flyer (Asiatic)

Night Flyer Lily

A cultivar of tiger lily, the dark purple flowers are dotted with black, making it one of the most striking Asiatic lilies. Can produce up to 12-15 flowers per plant.

Height: up to 4 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, recurved, down-facing pendant flowers

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

E) Red Lily Flower Types

1. Golden Apple/Carnic Lily (Lilium carniolicum)

Golden Apple Lily

Deriving its name from the historical region of  Carniola, these lilies may also  be orange to yellow with black dots. Blooms in early to mid summer.

Height: up to 2 feet

Flower Type: Around 3 inches, down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

2. Canada Lily (Lilium canadense)

Canada Lily

Unscented, primarily grown for its showy flowers that grow  in groups of 5-6 on each stem. Blooming season is between late spring and mid-summer, lasting about three weeks.

Height: 3-6 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches or smaller, down-facing recurved pendant flower

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

3. Wood Lily (Lilium philadelphicum)

Wood Lily

One of the most widespread native lilies, it can grow in various dry to moist soils having full sunlight to shade. May take about 4-5 years to flower after planting. Non-fragrant flowers bloom around mid-summer to early fall, 3-5 on each stalk.

Height: 1-3 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches, upward-facing, wide-open, star-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

4. Gray’s Lily (Lilium grayi)

Gray's Lily

A rare lily, with its native habitat threatened by grazing animals, it grows in full sunlight and cannot tolerate extreme cold. Blooms early in summer, each stalk can grow up to 5-6 flowers once established.

Height: 2-6 feet

Flower Type: 2.5-3 inches, down-facing, trumpet or bell-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

5. Black Beauty (Orienpet)

Black Beauty Lily

Marked by a characteristic green star pattern inside the pendant flowers, an established plant can produce over 60 flowers each season. Tall plants good for borders, and hedges to give some privacy.

Height: 5-7 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches, down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

6. Matrix (Asiatic, dwarf, pot)

Matrix Lily

Dwarf variety, good for indoor planting as it does not need too much care apart from regular watering and lots of sunlight. When planted outdoors, the perennial plant will multiply, but is not invasive.

Height: Up to 2 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, upright, wide open, star-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

7. Manitoba Morning (Martagon)

Manitoba Morning Lily

Can grow in most well-drained soils, with enough sunlight, but cannot survive waterlogged conditions. Once mature, each plant grows around 30-50 flowers each season.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 3 inches, down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

8. Flashpoint (Orienpet)

Flashpoint Lily

As the name implies, it is a vivid lily variety that draws attention to itself, making it suitable for fancy borders and small mixed flower gardens. Scented flowers bloom late in summer.

Height: 3-5 feet

Flower Type: 6-9 inches, side-facing, open, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

9. Black Out (Asiatic)

Black Out Lily

Dark red flowers may also appear black at times, growing in groups of 5-6 on each stalk. Perfect for adding brightness and drama to any garden.

Height: 2-4 feet

Flower Type: 6-12 inches, up-facing, wide open, flat

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

10. Claude Shride (Martagon)

Claude Shride Lily

Mahogany red flowers are marked with golden or orange spots. May take a couple of years to flower for the first time, but stays on for years once established.

Height: 3-6 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, downturned, pendant shaped, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

F) Types of Yellow Lilies

1. Tiny Bee (Asiatic, dwarf)

Tiny Bee Lily

Dwarf variety originally created for container planting, it can thrive in outdoor gardens as well. The plant’s short height and hardy nature makes it suitable for borders and flowerbeds.

Height: up to 1.5 feet

Flower Type: 5-6 inches, upright, open

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

2. Robert Swanson (Orienpet)

Robert Swanson Lily

Produces up to 40 mildly scented flowers per plant in a blooming season in late summer. Easy to grow, the attractive flowers are quite long lasting.

Height: 4-5 feet

Flower Type: 7 inches, side or down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

3. Luxor (Asiatic)

Luxor Lily

Fast-growing and hardy, these plants flower for years once established. Good for mass planting, and cut flowers too.

Height: 3-4 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, upward-facing, slightly recurved, trumpet-shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

4. Black Spider (Asiatic)

Black Spider Lily

Small to medium cream-burgundy flowers stand out in any type of a garden. Each stalk produces 5-7 showy flowers.

Height: 3 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, side or up-facing, open, flat

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

5. Citronella (Asiatic)

Citronella Lily

One of the few varieties of Asiatic lilies to produce pendant flowers, each plant produces up to 20 flowers, multiplying over the years.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: Around 6 inches, side or down-facing, recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

6. Golden Splendor (Trumpet)

Golden Splendor Lily

Tall plants good for borders in areas of garden where you might want a little privacy, though may need a little support from nearby shrubs. Produces 12-20 flowers on each stem.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: 6 to 12 inches, side-facing, trumpet shaped

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

7. King Pete (Asiatic)

King Pete Lily

A truly versatile lily variety, this plant produces different shaped flowers for a unique effect. Grows in groups of 6-7 flowers per stem.

Height: 2-4 feet

Flower Type: 3-6 inches, side-, up-, or down-facing, flat open or recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

8. Big Brother (Orienpet)

Big Brother Lily

The largest lily type yet, big brother grows over a foot across, with its fragrant flowers being good for cut flowers too. The bloom size increases over time as the plant gets better established. Unlike the others. this plant grows multiple stems from a single bulb.

Height: 4-6 feet

Flower Type: Up to 15 inches, upright, wide-open, slightly recurved

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Consider Before Selecting a Lily to Grow

  • True lily species vs hybrids: Though the species often thrive in wild, when it comes to growing in a garden environment, the hybrids are more adaptable than the species.
  • Growing from seeds vs from root bulbs: For the species (division IX), you can plant the seeds directly in your outdoor garden or planters. But for the hybrids, you need a greenhouse with proper temperature and growth lights for the seeds to germinate, as lily hybrids often do not come true from seeds if you plant them directly in your garden. However, this problem can be overcome by planting root bulbs for the hybrids.
  • Virus and other similar issues: In addition to common fungal diseases and root rot, most lily plants are susceptible to viral diseases, usually spread by aphids. Completely getting rid of any affected plant (stems and root bulbs) helps in keeping the diseases from spreading. Growing your lilies from seeds is a more effective method of preventing viral diseases as seeds are much less likely to carry any diseases than root bulbs.
  • Toxicity and danger: All lilies are toxic to cats, while some are toxic to even dogs. So, never let your pets near a lily plant in your garden as ingesting any part of the plant can be hazardous, causing kidney damage. In fact some types, like the Easter lily, can actually kill a cat if the leaves or even pollens are ingested. Ask your supplier about the safety of a plant for your dog.
  • Checking the authenticity of a seller: Make sure to get your seeds from a reputed seller. There are lots of online stores and nurseries that would offer you seeds/bulbs for attractive colors of lilies like blue and green, but these fail to come true more often than not.

Interesting Facts

  • A unique feature of the double Asiatic hybrids is that their anthers are replaced for the inner row of petals, and as a result, they do not produce any pollen.
  • The bulbs of certain species including the tiger and Turk’s cap lilies are edible, still used as a root vegetable in soups and stews. In fact, in earlier times they were grown for food.
by | Updated : May 15, 2019



  • 2 Comments

    1. B Kroeker says:

      With Golden Stone Lily — I’m finding some white and some light yellow and my bright yellow lilies with the same spots and height . Does the Golden Stone come in all those colors or why do I have 3 distinct colors when I only planted one color ?

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