65+ Types of Roses With Basic Information and Pictures

Roses are easily one of the most beautiful flowers you can have in your garden. Indeed, they are almost magical when they appear in flushes, covering the gorgeous bushes with red, pink, white, and yellow, filling your garden with their enticing fragrances. With the advancements in modern horticulture, they come in almost any color you can imagine. Considering all of this, you wouldn’t really mind the little extra effort it would take to grow them in your yard.

Different Types of Rose Bushes

Though there are over 150 species, and hundreds of hybrids, whenever you think of a rose, you are thinking of a garden rose, which is the highest classification of these flowering plants at present. Whether it is a natural species, a hybrid, or a cultivar, it will fall into one of the three types of garden roses. Following are some of the best-known roses, with their basic growing conditions and popular examples:

A. Wild Roses

1. Chestnut Rose (Rosa roxburghii)

Chestnut Wild Rose

Also known as burr rose, it produces large light pink, mildly fragrant flowers, occurring singly at the top of tall flower stalks. It does best in fertile, moist yet well drained soil. The bark looks attractive in its pale brown or beige color with peeling texture.

USDA Zone: 6-9

Blooming Season: Spring to summer

Plant Height/Width: 5-10 feet/up to 6 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun to partial shade

2. Sweetbriar Rose (Rosa rubiginosa)

Sweetbriar Wild Rose

Said to be a favorite of Shakespeare, it produces fragrant pale pink flowers with a single row of petals. Suitable for cut flowers. Blooming season lasts for about two weeks, but the scented leaves and the colorful large hips that turn orange in fall keeps the plants equally attractive. The hips are often used in teas.

USDA Zone: 4-8                

Blooming Season: Late spring to early summer

Plant Height/Width: 6-12 feet/up to 10 feet

Flower Size: 1-1.5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

3. Field Rose (Rosa arvensis)

Field Wild Rose

Vigorous shrub producing white, strongly fragrant flowers with golden yellow anthers. Flowers may appear singly, or in small groups of 2-3. With attractive long arching purplish stems, and hardy growing habits, it is a good option for hedges. Large orange-red hips add fall value as a garden plant.

USDA Zone: 6-10

Blooming Season: Spring to summer

Plant Height/Width: 5-10 feet/up to 6 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

4. Lady Banks’ Rose (Rosa banksiae)

Wild Lady Banks’ Rose

Often referred to just as Banks’ rose, this vigorous climber with a high growth rate can grow up to 50 unless pruned and maintained. Small, yellow or white, fragrant flowers grow in clusters. The plants are rather drought tolerant, and can grow in various soil types with moist, organic, well-drained soils being ideal. R. banksiae ‘Lutea’ is an award-winning cultivar.

USDA Zone: 6-10

Blooming Season: Spring

Plant Height/Width: 15-20 feet/over 10-15 feet

Flower Size: 0.5-1 inch

Sunlight: Full to part sun

5. Musk Rose (Rosa moschata)

Wild Musk Rose

An ancient species with unknown origin, it is believed to be originally from the western parts of the Himalayas. Over the past decades, it has been introduced to different places around the world, with various cultivars and hybrids including ‘ballerina’ and ‘prosperity’. Large white flowers grow singly on long curvy stems.

USDA Zone: 6-10              

Blooming Season: Late summer to autumn

Plant Height/Width: 10-12 feet/8-10 feet

Flower Size: 2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

6. Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)

Multiflora Wild Rose

Native to Japan, it is a thick perennial shrub presently found almost throughout the US. Commonly used for developing hybrids, this wild rose variety itself may be considered a weed a certain states. With support, it can also grow as a climbing vine. Fragrant white flowers grow in clusters. Prefers fertile loam soils.

USDA Zone: 3-9

Blooming Season: late spring to early summer

Plant Height/Width: Up to 10 feet/over 10-12 feet

Flower Size: 0.5-0.75 inches

Sunlight: Partial sun

7. Climbing Wild Rose (Rosa setigera)

Climbing Wild Rose

A woody vine with small pink, strongly scented flowers growing in clusters. Can grow up to 15 feet with proper support. Bright red hips appear in late summer after the flowering period is over. Can grow in well-drained sandy, loam, and clay soils with medium moisture. Tolerated shaded areas as well.

USDA Zone: 4-9

Blooming Season: Late spring to summer

Plant Height/Width: 6-8 feet/10-12 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full to partial sun

8. Rugosa Rose (Rosa rugosa)

Rugosa Wild Rose

Also known as beach rose or Japanese rose, this is another wild rose species native to eastern Asia. It has characteristic bright green foliage with wrinkled leaves marked with deep veins. Hardy, grows in almost all types of soil. Grows double flowers in shades of pink to mauve. Dark red rose hips appear in fall and winter, and are used in teas.

USDA Zone: 2-7

Blooming Season: early summer

Plant Height/Width: 4-8 feet/4-6 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: full to part sun

9. Common Wild Rose (Rosa virginiana)

Common Wild Rose

Often used for landscaping and garden hedges, this hardy perennial shrub is also known as Virginia rose. Quite drought tolerant, it produces fragrant pink flowers that can occur singly or in small clusters of 3-4 units. The red bark, and attractive bright red hips keep it almost equally attractive in winter.

USDA Zone: 3-8

Blooming Season: Late summer

Plant Height/Width: 4-7 feet/6-8 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full to part sun

10. Austrian Briar Rose (Rosa foetida)

Wild Austrian Briar Rose

Also knows as Austrian copper rose, this hardy perennial shrub grows mildly fragrant showy bright yellow to orange flowers that make excellent cut flowers as well. The bright flowers make a nice contrast with the dark green foliage, making it a striking ground cover plant. Can grow in various soil types, as long it is well-drained.

USDA Zone: 3-10

Blooming Season: Spring to summer

Plant Height/Width: 5-6 feet/5-10 feet

Flower Size: 2-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

B. Modern Garden Roses

1. Hybrid Tea Roses

Make excellent cut flowers, including most of the popular roses we see today. Originally created by crossing between tea roses and hybrid perpetuals, relatively modern types are hybridized from different hybrid tea rose varieties themselves. These are often counted among the least hardy and highest-maintenance roses. Almost all the hybrids have large, high-centered bloom, with their size and color depending on how much sunlight they recieve.

i) ‘La France’

La France Hybrid Tea Rose

One of the most recognizable roses available today, the light pink large, fragrant flowers are ‘weak-necked’ or nodding with 40-50 petals. The perennial bushy shrub does well in well-drained acidic soil. Repeat-bloomers throughout the season.

USDA Zone: 7b and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to early summer and fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-5 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Peace’

Peace Hybrid Tea Rose

Formally known as Rosa ‘Madame A. Meilland’, it is highly valued for its attractive pink-tinted yellow flowers with mild yet sweet fragrance. The plants grow as vigorous tall shrubs with glossy dark green foliage. Can grow in almost all types of acidic to alkaline soil.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Through spring and summer to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-6 feet/up to 3 feet

Flower Size: 5-6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘Mister Lincoln’

Mister Lincoln Hybrid Tea Rose

This large dark violet-red rose boasts of a strong damask scent, with 30-40 petals arranged in a compact formation. Repeat bloomers through the season, this plant grows best in all types of moist yet well-drained soils, having above-average heat and disease resistance.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season: Throughout summer

Plant Height/Width: 4-6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 5-6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Double Delight’

Double Delight Hybrid Tea Rose

As the name implies, this is one of the most striking multicolored double-flowered rose tinted with a yellow center, and white-cream-red petals. Best grown in moist well-drained soil in a sunny spot.

USDA Zone: 7 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring through fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-5 feet/4 feet

Flower Size: 5-6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

v) ‘Blue Girl’

Blue Girl Hybrid Tea Rose

Lavender-colored roses growing on strong upright stems in bushy hedge-forming plants with dark green foliage. The double flowers have more than 30 petals, with multiple blooms throughout the blooming season. Good disease-resistance.

USDA Zone: 7 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-5 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 5-6 inches

Sunlight: Partial to full sun

vi) ‘Tropicana’

Tropicana Hybrid Tea Rose

Profuse bloomer throughout the season, the plants grow as compact upright bushes. The flashy orangish red flowers have the strong characteristic rose fragrance. The plants are prone to mildew, and less winter-hardy than some other varieties, needing extra care when grown in areas with subzero temperatures.

USDA Zone: 7 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-6 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

vii) ‘Friendship’

Friendship Hybrid Tea Rose

This is a deep pink large flower with 20-30 petals and the typical rose fragrance. Flowers appear in clusters with each flower growing singly on a stiff upright stem. Tall, compact plants with dark green, leathery foliage are good for garden hedges and borders. Repeat bloomers.

USDA Zone: 7 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-7 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

viii) ‘Garden Party’

Garden Party Hybrid Tea Rose

A sophisticated variety with mildly fragrant large white flowers having over 40 petals, that may or may not be blended with pink or yellow. A profuse bloomer, the plant is susceptible to mildew. The award-winning flower is similar to the ‘Peace’ rose but is more delicate in nature.

USDA Zone: 7b and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring through summer and early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-7 feet/up to 4 feet

Flower Size:6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ix) ‘Sedona’

Sedona Hybrid Tea Rose

This one has large double flowers with rich hues of red, orange, and coral with 20-30 petals arranged in a neat spiral. The colors, reminiscent of a sunset in the deserts of the American Southwest, earned the rose its name. Plants grow as upright medium shrubs with dark green matte foliage.

USDA Zone: 6b and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to summer and early fall

Plant Height/Width: Up to 6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

x) ‘Apricot Candy’

Apricot Candya Hybrid Tea Rose

The soft coral scented blossoms with ruffled edged petals look palatable enough to earn them their name. The flowers are smaller than other hybrid teas, also having a rather unusual spicy fragrance. Upright bushy plants have a glossy soft green foliage that contrasts nicely with the flowers growing in clusters.

USDA Zone: 6b to 9b

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 5-6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

2. Polyantha Roses

Crossed between China, multiflora, and tea roses, these are known for their profuse bloom from summer through spring. Quite hardy and low-maintenance, the plants usually grow as short and compact shrubs. The small flowers come in shades of pink, red, and white, covering the foliage to produce a rather dramatic effect.

i) ‘The Fairy’

The Fairy Polyantha Rose

With good disease resistance, this is a popular hybrid with smaller light to dark pink flowers growing in clusters. The tiny compact double flowers have 20-30 petals, and a mild apple-like scent. The medium bushy plants have attractive fern-like, glossy foliage, making it ideal for garden borders, despite the fact that they bloom a little later than most garden roses.

USDA Zone: 4-9

Blooming Season: Early summer to early to mid-fall

Plant Height/Width: 2-4 feet/2-4 feet

Flower Size: 1-2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Cécile Brünner’

Cécile Brünner Polyantha Rose

Also known as ‘Sweetheart Rose’ or ‘Malteser Rose’, this one is not to be confused with the climbing rose variety having the same name. Other one growing as a rather short bushy plant and the other being a climber, the Polyantha ‘Cécile Brünner’ has very little thorns, unlike the latter. The vigorous bushes have lighter foliage than many other roses, which contrasts well with the tiny pale pink double flowers.

USDA Zone: 5b and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring through fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-4 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 1-1.5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun to light shade

iii) ‘Pink Fairy’

Pink Fairy Polyantha Rose

A valued addition to any garden, with an extended blooming season that lasts well into frost, the small bright pink to purplish double flowers have a mild apple scent. The compact bright green glossy or leathery foliage keeps you hedges looking fresh and vigorous even when they are not in bloom.

USDA Zone: 4-9

Blooming Season: Early summer to the start of frost

Plant Height/Width: 2-3 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 1-1.5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun to part shade

iv) ‘Red Fairy’

Red Fairy Polyantha Rose

This mildly- to non-fragrant variety compensates well with the profuse blooms of small scarlet flowers with 30-40 petals arranged in compact rosettes. Hardy to most soil types and common diseases, it is a good option for sunny borders in small to medium gardens. Makes excellent cut flowers, while the petals and hips have some culinary and medicinal uses too.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season:

Plant Height/Width: 2-3 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 1.5-2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

3. Floribunda Roses

Crossed between polyanthas and hybrid teas so the resultant variety could keep the qualities of both flowering profusely and coming in various colors. Floribundas grow as short stiff bushes and are good for borders and hedges. These include some of the best fragrance roses, and need relatively less care. Apart from the following, popular varieties include ‘Yellow Cushion’, ‘Mardi Gras’, ‘Intrigue’, ‘Jane Seymour’, and ‘Soaring to Glory’.

i) ‘Iceberg’

Iceberg Floribunda Rose

The mildly fragrant, small pure white double flowers are sometimes tinted with pink around late summer. Profuse bloomers all summer long, the dark green leathery foliage and the arching stems make the white flowers look even more stunning in contrast. Tolerates light shade, but full sun is needed for best performance. Often the choice of roses for wedding bouquets, with baby’s breath and calla lily.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Late spring to late fall

Plant Height/Width: Up to 6 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Hot Cocoa’

Floribunda Hot Cocoa Rose

Growing as a rather tall bushy shrub, this one is good for growing as a specimen rose, or as borders in large gardens. The large, rather unique dark rusty red flowers have a velvety texture with purple to burgundy undertones, and 30-40 petals. Quite resistant to both cold and heat.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Early spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘Julia Child’

Julia Child Floribunda Rose

Named after the iconic American figure, this relatively shorter rose bush variety does well in flower beds with its eye-catching bright yellow blooms, and nicely contrasting dark green leathery foliage. The vigorous rounded appearance of the shrub makes it a good choice for borders too. The flowers have a wonderful licorice-like scent.

USDA Zone: 5-10

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-4 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Anne Harkness’

Anne Harkness Floribunda Rose

The petrifying amber-gold flowers make excellent cut flowers, lasting longer than most other roses in water when displayed in a vase. Medium-sized flowers have 25-30 petals arranged in a neat spiral shape. The strong upright bush grows rather tall, with its rich, dark green foliage. Good choice for sunny borders in large gardens.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-5 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

4. Grandiflora Roses

These include floribunda x hybrid tea varieties that produce large flowers growing in clusters. These grow as hardy, vigorous upright shrubs.

i) ‘Queen Elizabeth’

Queen Elizabeth Grandiflora Rose

The delicate soft pink lightly fragrant flowers flush the compact bushes throughout the blooming season. They are borne singly on long almost-thornless stems. As the name would imply, it is one of the most-grown roses in England, and almost equally popular in the US. Grow quite tall, though not nearly as wide, making it a good option for high borders, and specimen planting.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 5-10 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Mother of Pearl’

Mother of Pearl Grandiflora Rose

Yet another pink to blush variety with slightly larger, equally stunning strongly-fragrant flowers, this plant can flourish in cold as well as hot, humid conditions. It is also noted for having good resistance against the black spot disease. The high-centered flowers appear in small clusters with each having 25-30 petals arranged in a tight rosette.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Spring through early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-5 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 4-5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘Cherry Parfait’

Cherry Parfait Grandiflora Rose

A mildly-fragrant, eye-catching rose with soft cream to white centers, bordered with a dark pink or rich red. The dark green glossy foliage adds to the glamor of the plant, though it might seem too dramatic for those who love the classic soft appearance of a rose. Also known as ‘Ice Cream’, and ‘Fire & Ice’, it does well as garden borders and in flower beds.

USDA Zone: 6b and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-5 feet/up to 4 feet

Flower Size: 4-5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Fragrant Plum’

Fragrant Plum Grandiflora Rose

The rather unique mauve to purplish flowers have a paler center with the color intensifying towards the edge. The fruity fragrance also makes them stand out in the crowd of modern garden roses. The plants do well with some afternoon shade, improving the form of the flowers.

USDA Zone: 7 and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to summer and early fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 4-5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

5. Miniature Roses

As the name implies, these are basically miniature versions of hybrid teas. The petite 2-feet tall plants do well in containers and are often grown as houseplants, or for small borders. In summer, they grow tiny flowers in various shades of red, pink, white, and yellow.

i) ‘Tom Thumb’

Tom Thumb Miniature Rose

Also known as ‘Peon’ rose, this miniature hybrid grows tiny red to pink semi-double flowers with 10-15 petals. The white or cream center makes the flowers stand out even better, in contrast to the dark bushy foliage. Excellent for a small garden border, or for the patio where you can create nice flower arrangements with container plants. Considerably drought-resistant.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 8-9 inches/up to a foot

Flower Size: 1-2 inches

Sunlight: Full Sun

ii) ‘Sugar Baby’

Sugar Baby Miniature Rose

The tiny light-to non-fragrant double-flowered rose grows in clusters, covering the lush dark green glossy foliage through summer and well into fall. Good for large containers where they can be grown for ground covers, borders, as well as specimen planting. Grows in clay to sandy soils as long as it has excellent drainage.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to late fall

Plant Height/Width: 1-1.5 feet/less than a feet

Flower Size: 1 inch

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘Sun Sprinkles’

Sun Sprinkles Miniature Rose

Despite being a miniature variety, this one grows relatively larger striking yellow flowers with 25-35 petals and a light spicy scent. Appearing individually on 8-10 inches long stalks, the roses make good cut flowers too. The small, well-shaped upright bush is suitable for a container, while also being hardy and disease-resistant enough to be grown outside as a groundcover.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to late summer

Plant Height/Width: Up to 2 feet tall and wide

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Black Jade’

Black Jade Miniature Rose

The flowers are non-fragrant, but they compensate with their attractive dark velvety red appearance that can add to the charm of any garden. Though no rose is truly ‘black’, the newer buds appear darker, almost black, with the color lightening as they bloom. Blossoms appear in flushes through the blooming season. However, the plant is not very winter-hardy, and is also susceptible to some diseases like mildew.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season:

Plant Height/Width: 1.5-2 feet/

Flower Size: 1 inch

Sunlight: Full sun

6. Climbing Roses

Though not exactly vines, climbing roses have tall arching yet stiff stems that can be trained along a wall, pole, or fence. They need annual pruning and monitoring to stay in shape and grow in the direction you want it to. Almost all garden rose varieties come in a climbing form where they grow 10-15 feet tall, blooming profusely from summer to fall. In addition to the following, some well-known varieties include ‘May Queen’, ‘Aloha’, ‘Climbing Gold Badge’, and ‘Don Juan’.

i) ‘Climbing Peace’

Climbing Peace Rose

All the characteristics of the majestic ‘Peace’ rose in a climber form – that is what the ‘Climbing Peace’ is. Large soft yellow flowers, with their mild fragrance, blooming through summer, this plant is suitable for those walls in your garden that may have some afternoon shade; though it does perfectly fine in full sun conditions.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to early fall

Plant Height/Width: Up to 20 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 5-6 inches

Sunlight: Full sun to part shade

ii) ‘Fourth of July’

Fourth of July Climbing Rose

The large red-white semi-double rose variety earns its name from the bright explosion of colors during its blooming season. Unlike most other roses, the ‘Fourth of July’ only has 10-15 petals, but boasts of a strong pleasant scent. Though a climber, you can also grow it as a regular shrub in relatively cooler regions.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Late spring to frost

Plant Height/Width: up to 10 feet/3-6 feet

Flower Size: 2-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun (may also tolerate light shade)

iii) ‘Eden’

True to its name, the stunning, rather large flowers have a mild yet sweet fragrance, and a majestic yellow-blush-cream coloration. The compact cup-shaped flowers have 40-50 petals. Considered among the best climbing rose varieties, this plant has better heat and disease-resistance than other climbing roses, with a slower or reasonable growth rate. Repeat-bloomer.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Late spring/early summer to late summer

Plant Height/Width: 6-12 feet/5-6 feet

Flower Size: 4-4.5

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Climbing Iceberg’

Climbing Iceberg Rose

Profuse bloomer, the small double flowers appear in clusters, covering the gorgeous dark green foliage. Hardy, quick-growing, and vigorous, it was originally grown as bush. With its relatively slow growth rate, and less thorny nature, this rose is ideal for smaller garden walls, and trellises. The white flowers have a mild fragrance, sometimes with a hint of pink in the petals.

USDA Zone: 4 and warmer

Blooming Season: early summer to fall

Plant Height/Width: 8-12 feet/6-8 feet

Flower Size: 2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

7. Rambling Roses

Often mentioned along with climbing roses, this is another class of attractive garden rose with long arching stems and lush glossy leaves. These can grow larger and wider than climbing roses, with average height being 20-30 feet. Another distinguishing feature is that ramblers flower only once a year.

i) ‘American Pillar’

American Pillar Rambling Rose

Known for its single 5-petal flowers of carmine-pink with a bit of white at the center, appearing in clusters, ‘American pillar’ has the mild characteristic rose scent. Produces large red to purple hips that are edible to birds. One of the few roses that thrives in part shade conditions too.

USDA Zone: 4-9

Blooming Season: late spring to early summer

Plant Height/Width: 12-20 feet/up to 12 feet

Flower Size: 1-2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun to partial shade

ii) ‘Albertine’

Albertine Rambling Rose

The plant grows into a tall shrub with sturdy stems that make it ideal for growing beside the walls, or gates in large gardens. The reddish stems are covered in strong thorns. Light pink double flowers have a strong sweet fruity fragrance with some characteristics of hybrid tea roses.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Late spring to early summer

Plant Height/Width: 10-15 feet/8-10 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

8. Ground Cover Roses

Also known as procumbent or landscape roses, these are for people looking for rose varieties with bushy growth habits and well-formed fragrant flowers without the maintenance needs of hybrid teas and floribundas. These are usually short bushes growing up to 2-3 feet, flowering profusely all summer.

i) ‘Avon’

Ground Cover Avon Rose

Pretty pink rose buds bloom into white to blush pink blooms, covering the dark green low-growing foliage through the long season. Flowers have a light yet noticeable fragrance with 10-30 petals. The sturdy green bush is reasonably resistant to common diseases like mildew.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Early/mid- spring to mid-fall

Plant Height/Width: 1-2 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Coral Drift’

Coral Drift Ground Cover Rose

As the name clearly denotes, the unique coral red flowers bloom profusely in clusters, lasting till frost. The tiny cupped flowers have 20-25 petals.The shrub grows in low mounds, ideal for smaller gardens and mixed flower beds. Thrives in well-drained moist soil, with excellent resistance to heat, drought, as well as frost.

USDA Zone: 4-11

Blooming Season: Spring to fall, till frost

Plant Height/Width: 1-2.f feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 1.5-2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘Flower Carpet Amber’

Flower Carpet Amber Ground Cover Rose

One of the more upright groundcover roses with bright golden amber flowers blooming profusely, creating a nice contrast with the leathery green foliage. The fast growing shrub is perfect for small to medium gardens, doing well with other popular groundcovers like French hydrangea, Japanese laurel, dwarf boxwood, yellow, and red shrub roses etc. Can do well in part shade.

USDA Zone: 4-11

Blooming Season: Late spring/early summer to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 2 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 2 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Sweet Drift’

Sweet Drift Ground Cover Rose

The low-growing, fast-spreading rose is good for mixed borders, and along walkways, with long-lasting small pink double flowers having a sweet tea rose-like scent. Flowers have 30-35 petals arranged in a compact formation. Though quite disease resistant, and relatively low maintenance, the plant needs lots of water, especially when the weather turns hot.

USDA Zone: 4-11

Blooming Season: Spring through summer

Plant Height/Width: 1-2 feet/2-3 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

9. English Roses

British rose-breeder David Austin started breeding these to keep all the qualities of both the old and modern garden roses. The result was a group of extremely high-maintenance plants with large, stunning flowers in various colors. These include some of the best and most fragrant roses.

i) ‘Abraham Darby’

Abraham Darby English Rose

A cross between the climbing rose ‘Aloha’ and the floribunda rose ‘yellow cushion’, it produces striking large flowers in peach, pink, apricot, and pinkish-yellow. BLooms have a strong rich fruity aroma with up to 100 petals arranged in a tight cup shape. The bushy vigorous shrub can also be grown as a climbing rose with proper support and care. It is named after Abraham Darby I, an Englishman who was an important figure in the Industrial Revolution.

USDA Zone: 4 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 5-10 feet/3-5 feet

Flower Size: 4-5 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Charles Austin’

Charles Austin English Rose

Also known as ‘Charming Apricot’, this is another classic creation of Austin by crossing between  yet another English rose called ‘Chaucer’ and the climbing rose ‘Aloha’. The large full apricot flowers have a strong fruity fragrance, and appear in clusters of 4 to 5 together with each having 50-70 petals. Grows into a large bushy upright shrub with dark green foliage that remains covered in flushes of heavy bloom through the season.

USDA Zone: 5b and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring through summer to fall

Plant Height/Width: 5-10 feet/3-6 feet

Flower Size: 4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iii) ‘A Shropshire Lad’

A Shropshire Lad English Rose

A vigorous climber, grows quickly into a large shrub, making it ideal to grow near walls, or on the back of flower borders in medium to large gardens. Blooms have a pleasant fruity aroma, but they are not as fragrant as other English roses. Rather shade-tolerant, and have fewer or no thorns. Though flowers appear in flushes during the blooming season, they start losing their vigour if the temperature gets warm.

USDA Zone: 5-9

Blooming Season: Spring to early fall

Plant Height/Width: 5-8 feet/3-5 feet

Flower Size: 4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

iv) ‘Golden Celebration’

Golden Celebration English Rose

One of the finest modern English roses with its bright yellow strongly scented flowers and well-shaped, rounded bushy foliage, this is good for hedges, as well as container planting. Boasts of an intoxicating tea fragrance that is reminiscent of strawberry and Sauternes wine. Flowers appear singly, yet profusely gracing the ends of the arching stems. Repeat bloomer.

USDA Zone: 4-9

Blooming Season: Spring to fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-6 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 4-5 inches

Sunlight: Light shade to full sun

10. Shrub Roses

A family consisting of various types of roses that does not fit into any other category. Most of these are crosses between old and modern garden roses, popular for their low-maintenance, disease resistant growth habits. Flowers can be of various shades of pink, red, white, yellow, and more.

i) ‘Mollineux’

Mollineux Shrub Rose

The golden yellow flowers with an amazing fruity scent have over 50-60 petals with shades of peach and blush. The rosebuds appear in darker shades of orange, becoming lighter as the flowers blossom. Blooms repeatedly through the season. The relatively short, yet upright thick shrubs are ideal for mixed flower beds, and also work well when grown as borders. Suitable for smaller gardens.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to summer and fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-4 feet/2-4 feet

Flower Size: 4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Double Knock Out’

Double Knock Out Shrub Rose

A low-maintenance rose that blooms profusely with the dark purplish green foliage getting covered in striking rose-red double flowers with a strong spicy fragrance. Repeat bloomer with a long blooming season. Low growing bush is ideal for flower beds and sunny borders. Can be combined with a number of other plants and flower including Japanese holly, variegated myrtle, and different varieties of phloxes.

USDA Zone: 5 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring through summer/early fall

Plant Height/Width: 3-4 feet/3-4 feet

Flower Size: 3-4 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

11. Patio Roses

A newly identified group of roses with characteristics somewhere between floribundas and miniatures, these grow short robust bushes with showy fragrant flowers. Quite hardy, needing little care, these are suitable for container planting in smaller gardens and terraces.

i) ‘Bright Smile’

Bright Smile Patio Rose

This miniature floribunda grows small single or semi-double light yellow flowers with fresh yet light fragrance. The flowers with 10-15 petals bloom in flushes throughout the season. The low-growing bush makes for good garden hedges, and the yellow flowers can adorn any mixed flowerbeds.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Spring to early/mid-fall

Plant Height/Width: 1.5-2 feet/1-2 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

ii) ‘Open Arms’

Open Arms Patio Rose

A climbing patio rose variety with single or semi double flowers with a mild to moderately strong musky scent. The buds are a darker pink in color, blooming into a pastel pink that fades into a paler shade. The prominent golden-yellow stamens add to the beauty of the flowers as they contrast against the tall, dark foliage.

USDA Zone: 6 and warmer

Blooming Season: Early/mid-summer to fall

Plant Height/Width: 4-8 feet/3-5 feet

Flower Size: 2-3 inches

Sunlight: Full sun

C. Old Garden Roses

1. Alba Roses

Old Garden Alba Rose

Known since the middle ages, these are hardy large-flowered roses with robust grey-green foliage. Grows into tall bushes of about 5-6 feet, these are known among the hardiest roses, able to survive in various conditions. They do rather well in partial shades as well. Flowers are white or various shades of pink.

Varieties: ‘Alba Semiplena’, ‘Alba Maxima’

2. Hybrid Gallicas

Hybrid Gallica Old Garden Rose

Believed to be the oldest varieties of hybrid roses. Today, they are known for their striking flowers of various colors including shades and combinations of white, pink, red, crimson, mauve, and purple. These flowers do not come in yellow. Their small bushy habits make them suitable for smaller gardens.

Varieties: ‘Charles de Mills’, ‘Rosa Mundi’

3. Damask Roses

Damask Old Garden Rose

Famous for their beautiful fragrant flowers, these are commonly grown for rose oil and used in perfume production. The plants usually have a neat, tall robust appearance with pink flowers growing in bunches.

Varieties: ‘Autumn Damask’, ‘Ispahan’

4. Centifolia Roses

Old Garden Centifolia Rose

Commonly known as cabbage roses, these are known for their strongly fragrant double-flowered blooms that grow on long stems that often bend with the weight of the flower, creating a nice effect. It has rough, thorny foliage with coarse leaves. Used in perfume-making.

Varieties: ‘Paul Ricault’, ‘Fantin Latour’

5. Cabbage Rose

Old Garden Cabbage Rose

Also known as provence rose or moss rose, Rosa×centifolia is a hybrid with only partially known parentage. It grows into tall shrubs of about 5 feet, with large flowers that bloom from spring to summer. Flowers are generally pink, but can also be white or dark purplish red.

Varieties: ‘Crested Moss’, ‘White Provence’, ‘Muscosa’

6. Portland Roses

Old Garden Portland Rose

This whole group was developed from a single rose received by Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, the Duchess of Portland between 1734 and 1761, also being named after her. Repeat bloomers, modern Portland roses have over a dozen varieties, producing white, to pink and purple showy flowers.

Varieties: ‘Arthur de Sansal’, ‘Blanc de Vibert’, ‘Bernard’

7. China Roses

Old Garden China Rose

Not to be confused with hibiscus, this group of roses is native to Southwestern China, growing as bushy thickets, ideal for hedges and borders. These relatively new varieties have been developed from the species Rosa chinensis. The 4-5 feet tall plants produce large, mildly scented double-flowers in spring. It is often crossed with tea and hybrid tea roses to produce attractive flowers. But, they cannot survive in cold areas.

Varieties: R. chinensis var. chinensis, R. chinensis var. spontanea

8. Bourbons

Old Garden Bourbon Rose

First grown in, and named after the Île Bourbon, now known as Réunion, an island off the Madagascar coast, these semi-climbing roses most likely originated from crosses between autumn damask and china roses. Repeat bloomers, these are characterized by glossy foliage, producing smaller flowers in large numbers

Varieties: ‘Mme. Pierre Oger’, ‘Louise Odier’

9. Tea Roses

Old Garden Tea Rose

Fascinating Asian cultivars with large pale yellow flowers having a fragrance reminiscent of tea, these were further hybridized with China, Bourbon, and Noisette roses in the 19th century. These repeat-blooming plants produce small flowers that might be slightly nodding due to weak flower stalks. Colors can vary from white to pale pink, yellow, to orange. These do not do well in colder climates.

Varieties: ‘Mrs Dudley Cross’, ‘Maman Cochet’

10. Noisettes

Old Garden Noisette Rose

Originally grown as a hybrid of certain China rose and musk rose varieties, the initial varieties were winter-hardy climbing roses with small flowers. Later, tea roses have been used for cultivars, with the resultant noisettes being characterized with larger flowers growing on vigorous climbing plants having less winter-hardiness.

Varieties: ‘Blush Noisette’, ‘Lamarque’, ‘Marechal Niel’

11. Hybrid Perpetual

Old Garden Hybrid Perpetual Rose

Hybridized from almost all the other varieties of old roses over the years, these have lost their popularity among modern gardeners due to their unpredictable flowering habits, and the limited color variation of white, pink, and red.

Varieties: ‘Général Jacqueminot’, ‘Reine des Violettes’

12. Hybrid Musk

Old Garden Hybrid Musk Rose

These are usually grouped along with old roses due to their similar growth habits, despite originating much later than the rest of the roses in this category. The plants are quite disease-resistant, giving rise to clusters of small to medium musk-scented flowers.

Varieties: ‘Moonlight’, ‘Penelope’

13. Hybrid Rugosa

Old Garden Hybrid Rugosa Rose

Though an old rose group, it has been used in growing hybrid roses since just the last couple of decades, resulting in a number of shrub rose varieties. These hybrids have excellent disease and cold tolerance, with low maintenance requirement, and flowers of various colors.

Varieties: ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’, ‘Hansa’

14. Bermuda “Mystery” Roses

Old Garden Bermuda Mystery Rose

As the name implies, roses in this group have been growing in different regions of the Bermuda for over a century, with little being known about their origin. Since their excellent resistance to fungal diseases and hot, humid conditions, they are suitable for growing in tropical regions.

Varieties: ‘Emmie Gray’, ‘Spice’

There was another type of old rose called the hybrid foetida or pernetiana, developed from Austrian briar, but it was later merged together with hybrid tea roses in 1930.

Roses usually need a reasonable amount of care, including fertilizing once or twice every blooming season, and pruning every year before winter. Climbing roses may need additional maintenance to keep their growth in check, while still producing healthy flowers. So, make sure to find out about the specific care requirements of different rose plants before choosing one from the nursery.

by | Updated : April 29, 2020



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